The Ten Light Bodies

 

 

“You have soul mates: your intellect, consciousness, subconscious, unconscious, you have your ten bodies.” – Yogi Bhajan

1. The soul body
The soul body is the primary identification of the self. It is recognized as the spirit within the life that we experience in this incarnation. The soul body transcends and survives our incarnation. Relating with the soul body is relating with the self at the most fundamental existential level. Knowing the soul is knowing that you are you.  The tendencies in one’s relation with the soul will determine how comfortable and at ease one is in “one’s own skin”.
If one has a separation or gap in awareness of the soul body it can cause insecurity or existential anxiety.  Someone who relates intimately with the soul can experience deep security.

2. The negative mind
The negative mind is one of the three mind bodies of our existence. It is the mind that gives attention to and keeps track of details through concepts and the accounting of their component details.  It is an instrument of survival and helps us to plan a course of action.  A main tendency of the negative mind is that its processes are linear and operate only on what is instinctual or has been predefined.
An overactive negative mind can produce a controlling and dominating tendency in behavior towards others. It can stifle creativity and create confusion and fear. A weak relationship with the negative mind can produce a “space case” with absentmindedness and an aversion to responsibility and accountability.

3. The positive mind
The positive mind is the mind that expands our vision to recognize what may be possible.  It helps us to overcomes obstacles in the face of adversity.  It tells us “we can do this”. The positive mind is not dissuaded by details that are operating contrary to our intentions.
A strong positive mind allows our creativity to know no bounds. With it we can expand our ideas beyond constraints that would thwart the negative mind.
A strong positive mind without a complimentary negative mind would allow us to run amok in our dreaming.  We can become a space case, as with a weak negative mind, and become divorced from reality.  We can lose our way in the face of adversity and become confused.  Our resolve can easily crumble.  Our projects may tend never to be finished.

4. The neutral mind.
The neutral mind gives us balance.  It is the arbitrator of the positive and negative.  It gives us the capacity to see beyond opposing tendencies and provides clarity to complex situations.  It is the source of creative solutions. It helps us not to identify with polarity and prejudice our perception.
As healers we look to the neutral mind not to take a position in the healing relation.

5. The physical body
The physical body is the body that we know in the material world.  When sufficient prana is present then the five elements are held together and give life to the physical body.  When prana wanes beyond a certain point, the elements cannot be held together and the physical body expires.  Healing in the physical body is facilitated by including and balancing elements.

6. The arc line

The arc line is the body that  protects the physical.  A strong arc line rejects all negative projections toward the physical. It rejects all mental projections from the point of origin. It rejects attacks by bacteria, viruses etc. The arc line has a connection also with the pranic body.
In its projective aspect the arc line projects one’s intentions. A strong arc line will give one the power of prayer.  In conjunction with the radiant body, the arc line strengthens the healer’s ability to heal.

When the arc line collapses, it gives a person a feeling of vulnerability,  helplessness and inadequacy.  When it is strong, one feels as if (s)he can do and accomplish anything.

7. The aura

The aura is the electromagnetic field that surrounds a person making one invulnerable to attacks from the outside.  It protects from negative projections, as the arc line, but also keeps one safe from all danger.  When a person’s awareness grows beyond the physical body, and (s)he can “feel the room”, and everything in it then the aura is expanded and strong. Martial arts practice gives a person awareness of the surroundings and expands the aura.

8. The pranic body

The pranic body is the process of a person’s “life energy”. A strong pranic body brings health and inner strength to the physical body.  The pranic body supports the arc line and the aura. A strong pranic body aids the healer with healing others. A weak pranic body diminishes vitality and makes one prone to illness.

Most martial arts train the practitioner to draw prana from the earth and maximize the flow in the pranic body.  This assists with directing and manifesting one’s intentions in relation with interactions with others and the environment.

9. The subtle body

The subtle body is the part of a person’s being that transcends space and time. Through the subtle body one can be aware of and know things not immediately  present in the physical and in time. The subtle body survives the incarnation and is present in the “ethers” as a “record” of ones existence. One can have awareness of another person by relating with and through the subtle body.

10. The radiant body

The radiant body is the quality of the electromagnetic field of a person that makes an impact externally and internally.  One’s intentions interact with the radiant body in a more subtle way than with the arc line. The radiance of the radiant body relates with more than a single intention as it permeates one’s entire presence and produces an impact. That impact is felt externally by others and internally with the self.

A strong radiant body has the power to heal others through one’s presence. A strong radiant body gives one confidence and a strong feeling of self and being whole. A weak radiant body makes one unsure and unconfident. In an extreme case, it can produce self destructive behaviors, such as unhealthy addictions and allow compulsions to rule the self.

 

Using the I Ching

The I Ching, or Book of Changes is based on the Tao.  The Tao is the fabric of the universe that contains and connects every conceivable and inconceivable aspect and manifestation of consciousness. The Tao itself is undefined.

The primary manifestation of the Tao is comprised of the dynamic state of polarity of yin and yang.  It is a system whose universe describes every possible state of existence.  It is constantly flowing and changing its balance between the two extreme polarities, total yin (earth) and total yang (heaven).

The I Ching as a book describes a structure that is designed to divine the relative quantities of yin and yang in any moment and circumstance and the tendency for their direction of change.  This structure, known as a form is a physical structure developed by mind that links to subtle structures of consciousness.

Through the use of such forms, physical orthogonal mappings of the mind (as produced by reason, relating to time and space as discrete phenomena) can be transformed into transverse experiences that transcend time and space (as  produced in the realm of shuniya), resulting in new orthogonal structures that can be perceived by the mind and the senses.  Using a form to produce a transverse experience in this way is called divination.  Divining using the form of the I Ching produces an answer to a question.   Engaging the I Ching or any form that produces a transverse experience requires intuition to facilitate the experience.  Intuition is a byproduct of living in a state of shuniya. Another example of a form that produces a transverse experience is White Tantric Yoga.  In this case, the form is facilitated by the intuition of the Mahan Tantric.

The I Ching itself is the ancient Taoist Oracle,  which is formless.  Its foundation is pure consciousness.  One brings form to it by first relating intuitively with the Oracle in the form of a question.  Then, performing a physical divining process.  Then, assigning the result of the divination to one or two of the set of 64 predefined forms known as hexagrams. Then, consulting narratives provided by a translator of the selected hexagram(s) from original Chinese texts and oral tradition.  Finally, interpreting these narratives relative to the original question.

About the I Ching

See previous readings

Tao Te Ching – Verse 21 – The Master keeps her mind always at one with the Tao; that is what gives her her radiance.

21
The Master keeps her mind
always at one with the Tao;
that is what gives her her radiance.

The Tao is ungraspable.
How can her mind be at one with it?
Because she doesn’t cling to ideas. Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 21 – The Master keeps her mind always at one with the Tao; that is what gives her her radiance.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 20 – Stop thinking, and end your problems.

20
Stop thinking, and end your problems.
What difference between yes and no?
What difference between success and failure?
Must you value what others value,
avoid what others avoid?
How ridiculous!
Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 20 – Stop thinking, and end your problems.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 18 – When the great Tao is forgotten, goodness and piety appear.

18
When the great Tao is forgotten,
goodness and piety appear.
When the body’s intelligence declines,
cleverness and knowledge step forth.
When there is no peace in the family,
filial piety begins.
When the country falls into chaos,
patriotism is born.

(translation by Stephen Mitchell, 1995)
-+-+-+-

The great Tao fades away
There is benevolence and justice
Intelligence comes forth
There is great deception

The six relations are not harmonious
There is filial piety and kind affection
The country is in confused chaos
There are loyal ministers

(translation by Derek Lin, 2006)
-+-+-+-

There is no Code of Ethics,
And there never was.
There is no kindness; no morality.
There is no genius.
Loyal sons and dutiful workers
Are unreal.
Stop.

(translation by Jeremy M. Miller, 2013)
-+-+-+-

from I Ching Online

 

Tao Te Ching – Verse 17 – When the Master governs, the people are hardly aware that he exists. Next best is a leader who is loved. Next, one who is feared. The worst is one who is despised.

17
When the Master governs, the people
are hardly aware that he exists.
Next best is a leader who is loved.
Next, one who is feared.
The worst is one who is despised.

Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 17 – When the Master governs, the people are hardly aware that he exists. Next best is a leader who is loved. Next, one who is feared. The worst is one who is despised.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 16 – Empty your mind of all thoughts. Let your heart be at peace. Watch the turmoil of beings, but contemplate their return.

16
Empty your mind of all thoughts.
Let your heart be at peace.
Watch the turmoil of beings,
but contemplate their return.

Each separate being in the universe
returns to the common source.
Returning to the source is serenity.
Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 16 – Empty your mind of all thoughts. Let your heart be at peace. Watch the turmoil of beings, but contemplate their return.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 15 – The ancient Masters were profound and subtle

15
The ancient Masters were profound and subtle.
Their wisdom was unfathomable.
There is no way to describe it;
all we can describe is their appearance.
Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 15 – The ancient Masters were profound and subtle”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 14 – Look, and it can’t be seen. Listen, and it can’t be heard. Reach, and it can’t be grasped.

14
Look, and it can’t be seen.
Listen, and it can’t be heard.
Reach, and it can’t be grasped.

Above, it isn’t bright.
Below, it isn’t dark.
Seamless, unnamable,
it returns to the realm of nothing.
Form that includes all forms,
image without an image,
subtle, beyond all conception.

Approach it and there is no beginning;
follow it and there is no end.
You can’t know it, but you can be it,
at ease in your own life.
Just realize where you come from:
this is the essence of wisdom.

(translation by Stephen Mitchell, 1995)
-+-+-+-

Look at it, it cannot be seen
It is called colorless
Listen to it, it cannot be heard
It is called noiseless
Reach for it, it cannot be held
It is called formless
These three cannot be completely unraveled
So they are combined into one

Above it, not bright
Below it, not dark
Continuing endlessly, cannot be named
It returns back into nothingness
Thus it is called the form of the formless
The image of the imageless
This is called enigmatic
Confront it, its front cannot be seen
Follow it, its back cannot be seen

Wield the Tao of the ancients
To manage the existence of today
One can know the ancient beginning
It is called the Tao Axiom

(translation by Derek Lin, 2006)
-+-+-+-

Sight and blindness are indistinguishable.
Thunder and silence are one.
Touch and ether are the same.
There is always light and dark.
Shape is illusion; form is Formless.
The future is the past.
The Beginning is the present.
Nothingness is the Zero called changeless.

(translation by Jeremy M. Miller, 2013)
-+-+-+-

from I Ching Online

 

Tao Te Ching – Verse 13 – Success is as dangerous as failure. Hope is as hollow as fear.

13
Success is as dangerous as failure.
Hope is as hollow as fear.

What does it mean that success is as dangerous as failure?
Whether you go up the ladder or down it,
your position is shaky.
When you stand with your two feet on the ground,
you will always keep your balance. Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 13 – Success is as dangerous as failure. Hope is as hollow as fear.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 11 – We work with being, but non-being is what we use.

11
We join spokes together in a wheel,
but it is the center hole
that makes the wagon move.

We shape clay into a pot,
but it is the emptiness inside
that holds whatever we want.

We hammer wood for a house,
but it is the inner space
that makes it livable.

We work with being,
but non-being is what we use.

(translation by Stephen Mitchell, 1995)
-+-+-+-

Thirty spokes join in one hub
In its emptiness, there is the function of a vehicle
Mix clay to create a container
In its emptiness, there is the function of a container
Cut open doors and windows to create a room
In its emptiness, there is the function of a room

Therefore, that which exists is used to create benefit
That which is empty is used to create functionality

(translation by Derek Lin, 2006)
-+-+-+-

It is the gaps that define.
That definition is perfect.
Ornate vessels hold water —
So it is Nothingness which has been defined, not the vessel.
The unwise have been tricked.

(translation by Jeremy M. Miller, 2013)
-+-+-+-

from I Ching Online

Tao Te Ching – Verse 9 – Fill your bowl to the brim and it will spill.

9
Fill your bowl to the brim
and it will spill.
Keep sharpening your knife
and it will blunt.
Chase after money and security
and your heart will never unclench.
Care about people’s approval
and you will be their prisoner.

Do your work, then step back.
The only path to serenity. Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 9 – Fill your bowl to the brim and it will spill.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 8 – The supreme good is like water, which nourishes all things without trying to.

8
The supreme good is like water,
which nourishes all things without trying to.
It is content with the low places that people disdain.
Thus it is like the Tao.

Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 8 – The supreme good is like water, which nourishes all things without trying to.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 7 – The Tao is infinite, eternal.

7
The Tao is infinite, eternal.
Why is it eternal?
It was never born;
thus it can never die.
Why is it infinite?
It has no desires for itself;
thus it is present for all beings. Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 7 – The Tao is infinite, eternal.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 6 – The Tao is called the Great Mother: empty yet inexhaustible, it gives birth to infinite worlds.

6
The Tao is called the Great Mother:
empty yet inexhaustible,
it gives birth to infinite worlds.

It is always present within you.
You can use it any way you want.
Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 6 – The Tao is called the Great Mother: empty yet inexhaustible, it gives birth to infinite worlds.”

Tao Te Ching – Verse 5 – The Tao doesn’t take sides; it gives birth to both good and evil.

5
The Tao doesn’t take sides;
it gives birth to both good and evil.
The Master doesn’t take sides;
she welcomes both saints and sinners.

The Tao is like a bellows:
it is empty yet infinitely capable.
The more you use it, the more it produces;
the more you talk of it, the less you understand.

Hold on to the center. Continue reading “Tao Te Ching – Verse 5 – The Tao doesn’t take sides; it gives birth to both good and evil.”