Elysium

I have only encountered a few dietary supplements that I would care to share with people.  I don’t push them on my clients.  I have only represented one of them as a distributor, mainly for the purpose of enjoying a distributor discount on the product from the manufacturer.

The first is Juice Plus, which my wife and I subscribed to and have used since December 1998.

The second is Elysium Basis which my wife and I have subscribed to and been using since February, 2015.  In the nearly there years that we have be using Basis, the main change since then in our well-being has been a noticeable increase in our available energy and endurance.  That is the main selling point of the product.  Here is what the manufacturer says about it.

The Science of NAD+, Explained

The coenzyme NAD+ has been called “the golden nucleotide” by one scientist, and the “linchpin of energy metabolism” by Scientific American. It’s the subject of countless preclinical studies indicating that increasing NAD+ levels in lower organisms may have a variety of positive effects on health. We’re especially interested in NAD+ at Elysium: We’ve demonstrated that our first product, Basis, increases NAD+ levels in humans, and we’re working on research to better understand how the gut microbiome affects systemic levels of NAD+. If you’re new to the science of NAD+, here are a few facts to get you started.

NAD+ is a coenzyme found in all living cells.

Coenzymes are colloquially referred to as “helper molecules” because proteins  —  large molecules made of amino acids that do the important biological work in the body  —  require them to do their work. (And they’re called coenzymes because most proteins are enzymes.) If you think of a car as a protein, getting you from place to place so you can go about your life, the gas (or battery if you have a Tesla) is the coenzyme, without which driving is impossible.

But gas (or batteries) can also be used to power any number of other things, from yachts to spacecraft. So too with NAD+, whose chief role is transferring electrons in redox reactions, including oxidative phosphorylation, otherwise known as the metabolic process our body uses to turn food into energy.

Nobel Prize-winning scientists discovered NAD+ more than 100 years ago.

NAD+ was first discovered by Arthur Harden and William John Young in 1906. In 1929, Harden and Hans von Euler-Chelpin won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on fermentation. They determined that fermentation required the presence of an enzyme (“zymase,” actually a mixture of enzymes) and a coenzyme which they called “cozymase,” now known as NAD+.

Euler-Chelpin further identified the structure of NAD+, which is made of two nucleotides, the building blocks for nucleic acids (the same thing DNA is made of). The role of NAD+ in fermentation, a metabolic process, foreshadowed the critical role that NAD+ plays in metabolic processes in humans.

The science of NAD+ is evolving as more research emerges.

Several important discoveries about NAD+ followed the 1929 Nobel Prize. The most recent discovery happened at MIT, when Dr. Leonard Guarente, founder of Elysium, and Dr. Shin-ichiro Imai observed that sirtuins  —  a family of proteins that have been shown in the laboratory setting to be influential in impacting healthspan  —  only function in the presence of NAD+. (Reminder: Sirtuins are the proteins that do biological work; NAD+ is the coenzyme that allows that work to happen.)

So why are scientists excited? An increasingly detailed picture of NAD+ shows its many functions, from energy creation, to sirtuin activity, to a wide range of other enzymatic activities including mitochondrial function, chromosomal integrity, gene expression, epigenetic and posttranslational modifications, and calcium signaling.

Learn How Basis Increases NAD+   

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