“The greatest blunder you can commit” Yogi Bhajan

“The greatest blunder you can commit is to think that mind and soul are yours. They are not finite, they cannot belong to finite. They are infinite, they belong to infinite. Just think that. Happiness will come to you.” Yogi Bhajan
(via Ram Anand)

 

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Today: Still waiting; stay calm – from the I Ching

Still waiting.  Despite criticism and other tongue wagging, stay calm.  Accept good advice, and lead from the heart.

 

Read the text from Richard Wilhelm's translation of the I Ching

Meditation
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Today: I Ching

“Enrich yourself with sacredness” Yogi Bhajan

“Enrich yourself with sacredness and opportunity will come to you from every corner.” Yogi Bhajan
(via Ram Anand)

 

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On this Fourth of July, 2017

Some of my friends and kindred souls are saying that the health of our democratic republic, America, has hit a new low.  I think that the real low was the Civil War, which, evidently, never ended completely, and hopefully, will not be repeated.  With all the diversity of our Nation, there are inevitably people who do want to go there and revive that tragic incident.  We know who they are.

As to why, the question is one of identity.  We can choose to identify with our self and God, or abdicate the elevated self to our ego, other egos, groups of people founded on ego and all the baggage of ego: misery, suffering, fear, hatred and a clinging to ignorance.

I brought this up earlier presenting  a reading from the I Ching for July 4.  Today, I am reminded that people whom we consider to be heroes are just people who remained themselves, no matter what the circumstances: forces, pressures, enticements, threats and dangers.

Today in the Los Angeles Times an article appeared which tells the story of a hero who is just a regular guy who knows who he is and what his duty is to himself, his friends, his nation and humanity.  It may be interpreted, as it is in the article, that certain ethnic or other groups are constantly having to prove that they are Americans.  I don’t see this guy as having any ideal outside of himself that inspired his bravery.  I see him as just a simple fellow from a nondescript place at a certain time under certain circumstances who found within himself the wherewithal to keep going.  In his moment of trial, he had faith.