Today: “It is our duty to become more aware than our ancestors.  We can improve on their vision, though be careful about throwing away what they have produced for our benefit.” – from the I Ching

It is our duty to become more aware than our ancestors.  We can improve on their vision, though be careful about throwing away what they have produced for our benefit.

See Yogi Bhajan’s quote for the day

Tao Te Ching – Verse 35 – She who is centered in the Tao can go where she wishes, without danger.

See previous reading

See previous previous reading

Musings on Grace and Gratitude

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18 – Eighteen Ku / Repairing the Damage

Winds sweep through the Mountain valley:
The Superior Person sweeps away corruption and stagnation by stirring up the people and strengthening their spirit.

Supreme success.
Before crossing to the far shore, consider the move for three days.
After crossing, devote three days of hard labor to damage control.

SITUATION ANALYSIS:

You are blessed with an opportunity to resuscitate that which others have abandoned as beyond repair.
This ruin wasn’t caused by evil intention, but by indifference to decay.
Just by addressing yourself to the problem, you exhibit a new awareness, a fresh perspective.
This is a time of recovery, renewal, regeneration.

Nine in the third place means:

Restoring what his father damaged.
Some regrets, but no great mistakes.

Setting right what has been spoiled by the father.
There will be a little remorse. No great blame.

Writing to Father

‘Writing to Father’ – Eastman Johnson 1863 – Boston Museum of Fine Arts

This describes a man who proceeds a little too energetically in righting the mistakes of the past. Now and then, as a result, minor discords and annoyances will surely develop. But too much energy is better than too little. Therefore, although he may at times have some slight cause for regret, he remains free of any serious blame.

4 – Four. Mêng / Inexperience

A fresh Spring at the foot of the Mountain:
The Superior Person refines his character by being thorough in every activity.
The Sage does not recruit students; the students seek him.
He asks nothing but a sincere desire to learn.
If the student doubts or challenges his authority, the Sage regretfully cuts his losses.

SITUATION ANALYSIS:

This is a time of interchange between a mentor and pupil.
Whether you are the teacher or the student, it is a time of companionship along a mutual path.
This hexagram also emphasizes the eternal, cyclical nature of the mentor/student relationship — a mentor is merely a more seasoned pupil, further along on the journey.
A pupil holds within himself the seed of a future Master.

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Today: “The attitude of gratitude is the highest way of living, and is the biggest truth, the highest truth.” Yogi Bhajan

“The attitude of gratitude is the highest way of living, and is the biggest truth, the highest truth. You cannot live with applied consciousness until you understand that you have to be grateful for what you have. If you are grateful for what you have, then Mother Nature will give you more.” Yogi Bhajan

Musings on Grace and Gratitude

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What else Yogi Bhajan said

Tao Te Ching – Verse 35 – She who is centered in the Tao can go where she wishes, without danger.

Verse 35 – She who is centered in the Tao can go where she wishes, without danger.

She who is centered in the Tao
can go where she wishes, without danger.
She perceives the universal harmony,
even amid great pain,
because she has found peace in her heart.
Music or the smell of good cooking
may make people stop and enjoy.
But words that point to the Tao
seem monotonous and without flavor.
When you look for it, there is nothing to see.
When you listen for it, there is nothing to hear.
When you use it, it is inexhaustible.

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